Hugh le Despenser, 1260/61 CE1326 (aged 65 years)

Name
Hugh /le Despenser/
Family with parents
Marriage Marriage
himself
1260/61 CE1326
Birth: March 1, 1260/61 CE of Winchester, Hampshire, England
Death: October 27, 1326Bristol, Gloucestershire, England
sister
Family with Isabel de Beauchamp
himself
1260/61 CE1326
Birth: March 1, 1260/61 CE of Winchester, Hampshire, England
Death: October 27, 1326Bristol, Gloucestershire, England
wife
1252
Birth: about 1252 15 of Warwick, Warwickshire, England
Death: Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England
Marriage Marriage
son
12861326
Birth: between 1286 and 1290 28 38 Barton, Gloucestershire, England
Death: November 24, 1326Hereford, Herefordshire, England
Birth
Marriage
Name
Death
Last change
Shared note

[zashin-1.ged]

1st/3rd Earl of Winchester, and 1st Lord Despenser. On May 28 , 1281, he was given the administration of the lands which his f ather had forfeited, and had livery of his mother’s lands on Aug ust 8, 1281, although he was not of age until the following Marc h 1. He held lands in the Midlands, the south, and South Wales . He held many offices and served in many wars. He was with th e King in Scotland in 1300, 1303, 1304, and 1306. He was a cons istently loyal servant of King Edward I and, more remarkably, o f Edward II. His loyalty was unshaken even by the Gaveston affai r. He was at the battle of Bannockburn on June 24, 1314, and ac companied the King in his flight to Dunbar, and thence by sea t o Berwick. A few months afterwards, the party of Simon de Montf ort, earl of Lancaster, obtained his dismissal from court, and h is removal from the council in February, 1314. He was much hate d by Edward's enemies for his influence over the King after Gave ston's death. He was summoned to Parliament from June 24, 1295 , to March 14, 1321/22, by writs directed Hugoni le Despenser, w hereby he is held to have become lord le Despenser. In May an d June, 1321, the barons of the Welsh Marches and their adherent s revaged the lands of the younger Despenser in Wales and thos e of the elder throughout the country. In August of that year , both Despensers were accused in Parliament, chiefly on accoun t of the son’s misconduct, of many misdeeds, such as accroachin g to themselves the King’s power, counselling the King evilly, r eplacing good ministers with bad, and so forth. Both Despenser s were disinherited forever on August 19, 1321, and exiled fro m the realm. The elder Hugh accordingly retired to the Continen t. His lands were taken into the King’s hands on September 15 , 1321. The proceedings against the Despensers were annulled an d the elder’s lands were restored on May 7, 1322. On May 10, th e King created him earl of Winchester. On the King’s flight t o Wales in October, 1236, the earl was dispatched to defend Bris tol, which, however, he at once surrendered on the arrival of th e Queen on October 26. The next day, he was tried, without bein g allowed to speak in his own defense, condemned to death as a t raitor, and hanged on the common gallows. On his death, all hi s honors were forfeited and the sentence of exile passed on hi m in 1321 was reaffirmed. One chronicler described him as a wor thy man, who was destroyed by his devotion to his son; but in fa ct he profited greatly from the younger Hugh's meteoric rise t o even greater power than his - and in 1322 he became earl of Wi nchester. His unpopularity grew with that of his son. He was s trung high on the public gallows at Bristol in 1326, and vilifie d by the mob as a traitor.

Shared note

[zashin-1.ged]

They married without the King’s license. The fine of 2000 mark s was later remitted.